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Modern history

Modern history, also referred to as the modern period or the modern era, is the historiographical approach to the timeframe after the post-classical era (known as the Middle Ages). Modern history can be further broken down into the early modern period and the late modern period after the French Revolution and the Industrial Revolution. Contemporary history is the span of historic events that are immediately relevant to the present time. The modern era began approximately in the 16th century.

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A Short History of the Civil War

James L. Stokesbury


  1. Building Armies
  2. Trampling Out the Vintage . . .
  3. Where the Grapes of Wrath Are Stored
  4. The Death Grip
  5. The Collapse of the Confederacy
  6. Suggestions for Further Reading
  7. Choosing Sides
  8. Opening Operations
  9. Western Operations
  10. Spring in the East
  11. The War in the West
  12. Eastern Maneuvers
  13. The War Economies
  14. The War in Equilibrium
  15. Problems of Command and Strategy
  16. The Killing Season
  17. The Atlanta Campaign
  18. The Folks at Home
  19. Defeat and Victory
  20. From Washington to Charleston
  21. From Settlement to Secession
  22. The Year Ends Badly
  23. Civil War Tactics and Strategy

Early Modern Europe 1450–1789

Merry E. Wiesner-Hanks


  1. Structure of the book
  2. Europe in the world of 1450
  3. Individuals in society
  4. Politics and power
  5. Village bylaws in England
  6. Cultural and intellectual life
  7. Economics and technology
  8. CHAPTER SUMMARY
  9. Individuals in society, 1450–1600
  10. The body
  11. The life cycle: marriage
  12. The life cycle: widowhood and old age
  13. The life cycle: death
  14. CHAPTER SUMMARY
  15. Politics and power, 1450–1600
  16. Taxes, bureaucracies, and marital politics
  17. The British Isles
  18. The Holy Roman Empire
  19. Italy
  20. CHAPTER SUMMARY
  21. Cultural and intellectual life, 1450 –1600
  22. Schools and education
  23. Political theory
  24. Humanism
  25. Vernacular literature and drama
  26. The radical Reformation
  27. Religious wars
  28. CHAPTER SUMMARY
  29. Economics and technology, 1450–1600
  30. Capitalism, economic theory, and population growth
  31. Late medieval agriculture
  32. Rural developments in western Europe
  33. Neo-serfdom and slavery in eastern Europe
  34. CHAPTER SUMMARY
  35. Indian Ocean connections
  36. Early voyagers after Columbus
  37. Europeans in Asia: merchants and missionaries
  38. Europeans in Africa: slavers and sugar growers
  39. Global connections and the Columbian exchange
  40. CHAPTER SUMMARY
  41. The social body: orders and classes
  42. The inner body: emotions and passions
  43. The studied body: anatomy and medical theory
  44. The deviant body: sex crimes and scandals
  45. CHAPTER SUMMARY
  46. Absolutism in theory and practice
  47. Spain and Portugal
  48. The British Isles
  49. Learned societies, salons, and newspapers
  50. Ancient authorities and new methods in science
  51. Mathematics, motion, and the mind of God
  52. Natural rights and their limits in the Enlightenment
  53. Music
  54. Religious consolidation and renewal, 1600–1789
  55. Protestant state churches
  56. Church and state in Catholicism
  57. Spiritualism and pietism
  58. Moravians and Methodists
  59. Gender issues in western Christianity
  60. Eastern Orthodoxy
  61. Witchcraft
  62. Judaism
  63. Islam
  64. CHAPTER SUMMARY
  65. Economics and technology, 1600–1789
  66. Agricultural change and rural protests
  67. Population growth
  68. Proto-industry and manufactories
  69. Industry and the Industrial Revolution
  70. Industry and the Industrial Revolution
  71. Introduction
  72. Sources for early modern history
  73. CHAPTER SUMMARY
  74. Travel beyond Europe
  75. Pius II calls for a Crusade against the Turks
  76. Religious institutions, ideas, and practices
  77. The life cycle: childhood and youth
  78. The life cycle: sexuality
  79. Family, kin, and community networks
  80. Military technology and organization
  81. Standing armies and navies
  82. France
  83. Spain and Portugal
  84. The Ottoman Empire
  85. Eastern and northern Europe
  86. Power at the local level
  87. Music and art
  88. CHAPTER SUMMARY
  89. Religious reform and consolidation, 1450–1600
  90. The early Reformation
  91. The Reformation in England
  92. Social change and the Reformation
  93. Calvinism
  94. The Catholic Reformation
  95. Later religious wars
  96. Mining and metallurgy
  97. Cloth and commerce
  98. Banking and money-lending
  99. Urban life
  100. Poverty and crime
  101. Europe in the world, 1450–1600
  102. Chinese and Portuguese voyages
  103. Columbus’s background and voyages
  104. Europeans in Asia: merchants and missionaries
  105. Europeans in the Americas: conquerors and miners
  106. Individuals in society, 1600–1789
  107. The writing body: letters and diaries
  108. The inner body: emotions and passions
  109. The reproducing body: childbirth and contraception
  110. Politics and power, 1600–1789
  111. Warfare and alliances
  112. France
  113. The Dutch Republic
  114. Habsburg lands
  115. Brandenburg-Prussia
  116. Sweden and Poland
  117. Russia
  118. Enlightened rulers
  119. CHAPTER SUMMARY
  120. The revolution in astronomy
  121. Reason, knowledge, and property
  122. Literature and drama
  123. Art and architecture
  124. CHAPTER SUMMARY
  125. Commerce, banking, and money
  126. Europe in the world, 1600–1789
  127. Explorations
  128. Trade and colonies in the Indian Ocean
  129. Trade and colonies in the Caribbean
  130. Trade and colonies in the Atlantic
  131. Colonies, difference, and race
  132. The effects of colonialism
  133. CHAPTER SUMMARY
  134. EPILOGUE
  135. The Ottoman Empire
  136. Cultural and intellectual life, 1600–1789

 


 

World History