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 The Complete Archaeology of Greece: From Hunter-Gatherers to the 20th Century A.D.
The Complete Archaeology of Greece: From Hunter-Gatherers to the 20th Century A.D.
Author: John Bintliff
The Complete Archaeology of Greece: From Hunter-Gatherers to the 20th Century A.D.
Wiley-Blackwell
2012
Format: PDF
Size: 13.3 Mb
Language: English

The Complete Archaeology of Greece covers the incredible richness and variety of Greek culture and its central role in our understanding of European civilization, from the Palaeolithic era of 400,000 years ago to the early modern period. In a single volume, the field's traditional focus on art and architecture has been combined with a rigorous overview of the latest archaeological evidence forming a truly comprehensive work on Greek civilization.
- A unique single-volume exploration of the extraordinary development of human society in Greece from the earliest human traces up till the early 20th century AD
- Provides 22 chapters and an introduction chronologically surveying the phases of Greek culture, with over 200 illustrations
- Features over 200 images of art, architecture, and ancient texts, and integrates new archaeological discoveries for a more detailed picture of the Greece past, its landscape, and its people
- Explains how scientific advances in archaeology have provided a broader perspective on Greek prehistory and history
- Offers extensive notes on the text, freely available online at www.wileyonlinelibrary.com, that include additional details and references for the serious researcher and amateur
- Selected by Choice as a 2013 Outstanding Academic Title

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 Ancient Egypt and the Near East An Illustrated History
Ancient Egypt and the Near East An Illustrated History
Author: Marshall Cavendish
Ancient Egypt and the Near East An Illustrated History
Marshall Cavendish Corporation
2010
ISBN: 0761479341
Language: English
Pages: 144
Format: PDF
Size: 25,41 МБ
The world of ancient Egypt brought significant achievements and changes to the world and even today there is so much to be learned from this great early civilization. The pharaohs as well as great kings like Hammurabi and Nebuchadnezzar are all part of the time period covered by this book. The book includes detailed chapters on each of the key peoples who played a role in ancient Egypt. For example, the Sumerians (5000-2004 BC) were one of the world's first major civilizations and developed a form of writing called cuneiform. There were also the seafaring Phoenician traders and the Hittite warriors as well as the Babylonians, the Assyrians, the Israelites and the Persians.

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 House of Eternity: The Tomb of Nefertari
House of Eternity: The Tomb of Nefertari
Author: John K. McDonald
House of Eternity: The Tomb of Nefertari
The Getty Conservation Institute and the J. Paul Getty Museum
1996
Format: pdf
Size: 32,63 mb
Language: English

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 How Rome Fell: Death of a Superpower
How Rome Fell: Death of a Superpower
: How Rome Fell: Death of a Superpower
Author : Adrian Goldsworthy
Weidenfeld & Nîcholson
: 2010
ISBN: 9780300164268
Pages: 560
Format : epub,mobi
Size : 16,4 MB
Language : English

Starred Review. At only 40 years of age, British historian Goldsworthy's (Caesar) ninth Roman history offers the same high level of scholarship, analysis and lucid prose as the previous eight. After a superb survey of Roman politics and civilization, Goldsworthy begins with the death in A.D. 180 of emperor Marcus Aurelius, whose reign is traditionally viewed as the apex of Roman power. During the disastrous century that followed, emperors rarely ruled more than a few years most were murdered, and civil wars raged, though there was some stability during the reigns of Diocletian and Constantine. Invasions slowly chipped away at the empire until it vanished in A.D. 476 with the abdication of the last Western emperor. Goldsworthy makes sense of 300 years of poorly documented wars, murders and political scheming. Highly opinionated, he presents surviving documents and archeological evidence to back his views such as that Constantine became Christian because Roman leaders traditionally believed that divine help won battles, and the Christian god seemed to Constantine like the front-runner. This richly rewarding work will serve as an introduction to Roman history, but will also provide plenty of depth to satisfy the educated reader.

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 Tutankhamun's Armies - Battle and Conquest during Ancient Egypt's Late 18th Dynasty
Tutankhamun's Armies - Battle and Conquest during Ancient Egypt's Late 18th Dynasty
Author: John Coleman Darnell, Colleen Manassa
Tutankhamun's Armies - Battle and Conquest during Ancient Egypt's Late 18th Dynasty
John Wiley & Sons
2007
Format: PDF
Pages: 302
Language: English
Size: 82 MB

The force that forged an empire. The furious thunder of thousands of hooves, the clatter and sheen of bronze armor sparkling in the desert sun, the crunch of wooden wheels racing across a rock–strewn battlefield–and leading this terrifying chariot charge, the gallant Pharaoh, the ribbons of his blue war crown streaming behind him as he launches yet another arrow into the panicking mass of his soon–to–be–routed enemies. While scenes like the one depicted above did occur in ancient Egypt, they represent only one small aspect of the vast, complex, and sophisticated military machine that secured, defended, and expanded the borders of the empire during the late Eighteenth Dynasty. In Tutankhamun′s Armies, you′ll discover the harsh reality behind the imperial splendor of the New Kingdom and gain a new appreciation for the formidable Egyptian army–from pharaoh to foot soldier. You′ll follow "the heretic king" Akhenaten, his son Tutankhamun, and their three Amana–Period successors as they employ double–edge diplomacy and military might to defeat competing powers, quell internal insurrections, and keep reluctant subject states in line. This vivid and absorbing chronicle will forever change the way you think about the glories and riches of ancient Egypt.

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 King and Court in Ancient Persia, 559 to 331 B.C.E.
King and Court in Ancient Persia, 559 to 331 B.C.E.
Author : Lloyd Llewellyn
: King and Court in Ancient Persia, 559 to 331 B.C.E. (Debates and Documents in Ancient History)
Edinburgh University Press Ltd
: 2013
ISBN: 9780748641253
Pages: 224
Format : pdf
Size : 5,3 MB
Language : English

The first Persian Empire (559 331 B.C.E.) was the largest land empire the world had yet seen, and at the heart of its vast dominions, in the south of modern-day Iran, was the person of the Great King. Hidden behind the walls of his vast palace, surrounded by the complex rituals of court ceremony, the Persian monarch was the undisputed master of his realm, a god-like figure inspiring awe, majesty, and mystery. Yet the Great King's court was no mere platform for meaningless theatrical display. Presentation mattered, and nobles vied for position and prestige while the royal family struggled to fend off the threat of various successions, conflicts, murders, and usurpations. This book not only treats the court as the center of political decision-making in early Persia, it also recognizes its vast contribution to cultural expression.

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 Sumer - Cities of Eden
Sumer - Cities of Eden
Sumer: Cities of Eden
Author: composite authors
Time Life Education
Graduation Year: 1993
Language: English
Quality: excellent
Format: Pdf
Pages: 168
Size: 36,4 Mb

Textbooks on the sumerians are often filled with with art and fail to communicate the tremendous contributions of these ancient people. This book provides an objective evaluation of the builders of mankind's first civilization. The reader is left wanting to learn more about the sumerians who were the first to develop writing, wheel, law, school, war, art, cities, ..., etc.
Readers assume the role of archaeologists, uncovering secrets of ancient civilizations. Stunning photographs and illustrations, plus detailed cutaways, maps and diagrams.

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 Ancient Mesopotamia: New Perspectives
Ancient Mesopotamia: New Perspectives
Ancient Mesopotamia: New Perspectives
Author: Jane R. McIntosh
ABC-CLIO
Understanding Ancient Civilizations
2005
ISBN: 1576079651
Format: PDF
Size: 9,6 МВ
Language: English
Pages: 415

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 Greek and Roman Warfare - Battles, Tactics and Trickery
Greek and Roman Warfare - Battles, Tactics and Trickery
Author: John Drogo Montagu
Greek and Roman Warfare - Battles, Tactics and Trickery
Greenhill Books
2006
Format: PDF
Pages: 256
Language: English
Size: 48 MB

Greek and Roman Warfare: Battles, Tactics and Trickery is a uniquely detailed work which explores the tactics and battle strategies of the Graeco-Roman period. This incisive study goes beyond the arms and armour to reveal the psychology behind history's most emblematic battles. The technology of an army is of course an important factor in its success, but battles are ultimately won by tactics and strategy. From the cunning ambush to oxen with torches masquerading as an escaping army at night, Drogo Montagu explores the intricacies of waging war in the ancient world. Using his extensive knowledge of Graeco-Roman military history, he has created a gripping account of classical military thought. Montagu draws on the great historians of the time Livy, Plutarch, Xenophon and Josephus among them to illustrate the different elements that an army required to defeat its enemy on the battlefield, be it by force or guile. In addition, he offers details on how a commander would maintain the morale and fitness of his troops, as well as conduct their training. Greek and Roman Warfare provides an incredibly thorough view of the tactics and strategy of battle in ancient times from all perspectives, making it one of the most complete studies of Graeco-Roman warfare to date.

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 Warfare in the Classical World
Warfare in the Classical World
Author: John Gibson Warry
Warfare in the Classical World (A Salamander book)
University of Oklahoma Press
1980
Format: PDF
Pages: 228
Language: English
Size: 60.2 MB

This superbly illustrated volume traces the evolution of the art of warfare in the Greek and Roman worlds between 1600 B.C. and A.D. 800, from the rise of Mycenaean civilization to the fall of Ravenna and the collapse of the western Roman Empire. John Warry tells of an age of great military commanders such as Alexander the Great, Hannibal, and Julius Caesar - men whose feats of generalship still provide material for discussion and admiration in the military academies of the world. Rich illustrations of soldiers in uniform, equipment, weapons, warships, siege machines, war elephants, and more are accompanied by extensive captions. The text is complemented by a running chronology, 16 maps, 50 newly researched battle plans and tactical diagrams, and 125 photographs, 65 of them in color.

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 Secrets of the Exodus: The Egyptian Origins of the Hebrew People
Secrets of the Exodus: The Egyptian Origins of the Hebrew People
Author: Messod Sabbah, Roger Sabbath
Secrets of the Exodus: The Egyptian Origins of the Hebrew People
Helios Press
2004
Format: PDF
Size: 26.41 MB
This fascinating reference fuels the passionate debate about the biblical Exodus with a provocative thesis: Not only was Moses an Egyptian but so were the Hebrew people who followed him to Canaan.
Through linguistic, philologic, and religious explorations, the authors prove that the "Chosen People" were not slaves from a foreign country but high-ranking Egyptian priests and the adherents of the monothiest pharaoh Akhenaton. During a counterrevolution against monotheism, his followers were forced to move to the Egyptian province of Canaan.

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 Cross and Scepter: The Rise of the Scandinavian Kingdoms from the Vikings to the Reformation
Cross and Scepter: The Rise of the Scandinavian Kingdoms from the Vikings to the Reformation
Author:Sverre Bagge
Cross and Scepter: The Rise of the Scandinavian Kingdoms from the Vikings to the Reformation
Princeton University Press
2014
ISBN:069116150X
Format:epub
Size:3.78 Mb
Pages:336
Language:English

Christianity and European-style monarchy--the cross and the scepter--were introduced to Scandinavia in the tenth century, a development that was to have profound implications for all of Europe. Cross and Scepter is a concise history of the Scandinavian kingdoms from the age of the Vikings to the Reformation, written by Scandinavia's leading medieval historian. Sverre Bagge shows how the rise of the three kingdoms not only changed the face of Scandinavia, but also helped make the territorial state the standard political unit in Western Europe. He describes Scandinavia's momentous conversion to Christianity and the creation of church and monarchy there, and traces how these events transformed Scandinavian law and justice, military and administrative organization, social structure, political culture, and the division of power among the king, aristocracy, and common people.
Bagge sheds important new light on the reception of Christianity and European learning in Scandinavia, and on Scandinavian history writing, philosophy, political thought, and courtly culture. He looks at the reception of European impulses and their adaptation to Scandinavian conditions, and examines the relationship of the three kingdoms to each other and the rest of Europe, paying special attention to the inter-Scandinavian unions and their consequences for the concept of government and the division of power.

Cross and Scepter provides an essential introduction to Scandinavian medieval history for scholars and general readers alike, offering vital new insights into state formation and cultural change in Europe.

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 Ancient Greece and Rome: An Encyclopedia for Students
Ancient Greece and Rome: An Encyclopedia for Students
Author: Carroll Moulton
Ancient Greece and Rome: An Encyclopedia for Students
Charles Scribners & Sons
1998
ISBN: 0684805073
Format: PDF
Size: 82,9 МБ
Language: English
Pages: 809
Presents a history of ancient Greece and Rome as well as information about the literature and daily life of these early civilizations.

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 Troy: Last War of the Heroic Age
Troy: Last War of the Heroic Age
Author: Si Sheppard
Troy: Last War of the Heroic Age
Osprey Publishing
Osprey Myths and Legends 8
ISBN: 1472801288
2014
Format: PDF (e-book)
Pages: 82
Size: 6 Mb
Language: English

When Paris, prince of Troy, ran off with Helen, wife of the king of Sparta, it launched the greatest war of the mythic age of Greece. Heroes and gods assembled on both sides, as the combined armies of Greece launched a siege that would last for ten years. During that time, famous heroes, such as Achilles, Ajax, and Hector, would find glory on the battlefield, before being cut down. Others, such as Agamemnon, Odysseus, and Aeneas, would survive the war, only to face even greater challenges afterwards.

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 The Roman Empire and the Indian Ocean: Rome's Dealings with the Ancient Kingdoms of India, Africa and Arabia
The Roman Empire and the Indian Ocean: Rome's Dealings with the Ancient Kingdoms of India, Africa and Arabia
Author: Raoul McLaughlin
The Roman Empire and the Indian Ocean: Rome's Dealings with the Ancient Kingdoms of India, Africa and Arabia
Pen and Sword
2014
Format: PDF
Size: 10.7 Mb
Language: English

The ancient evidence suggests that international commerce supplied Roman government with up to a third of the revenues that sustained their empire. In ancient times large fleets of Roman merchant ships set sail from Egypt on voyages across the Indian Ocean. They sailed from Roman ports on the Red Sea to distant kingdoms on the east coast of Africa and the seaboard off southern Arabia. Many continued their voyages across the ocean to trade with the rich kingdoms of ancient India. Freighters from the Roman Empire left with bullion and returned with cargo holds filled with valuable trade goods, including exotic African products, Arabian incense and eastern spices.
This book examines Roman commerce with Indian kingdoms from the Indus region to the Tamil lands. It investigates contacts between the Roman Empire and powerful African kingdoms, including the Nilotic regime that ruled Meroe and the rising Axumite Realm. Further chapters explore Roman dealings with the Arab kingdoms of south Arabia, including the Saba-Himyarites and the Hadramaut Regime, which sent caravans along the incense trail to the ancient rock-carved city of Petra.
The Roman Empire and the Indian Ocean is the first book to bring these subjects together in a single comprehensive study that reveals Rome’s impact on the ancient world and explains how international trade funded the Legions that maintained imperial rule. It offers a new international perspective on the Roman Empire and its legacy for modern society.

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 Ancient Mesopotamia
Ancient Mesopotamia
Ancient Mesopotamia (Ancient Civilizations)
Author: Tom Head
Essential Library
Ancient Civilizations
2015
ISBN-13: 978-1624035418
Pages: 115
Language: English
Format: PDF (True)
Size: 18 MB

"In Ancient Mesopotamia, readers discover the history an.

d impressive accomplishments of the ancient Mesopotamians, including their extraordinary cultural achievements and technological wonders. Engaging text provides details on the civilization's history, development, daily life, culture, art, technology, warfare, social organization, and more."--Publisher's web site.

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 Akhenaten and the Origins of Monotheism
Akhenaten and the Origins of Monotheism
Author: James K. Hoffmeier
Akhenaten and the Origins of Monotheism
Oxford University Press
2015
Format: PDF
Size: 19.9 Mb
Language: English

Pharaoh Akhenaten, who reigned for seventeen years in the fourteenth century B.C.E, is one of the most intriguing rulers of ancient Egypt. His odd appearance and his preoccupation with worshiping the sun disc Aten have stimulated academic discussion and controversy for more than a century. Despite the numerous books and articles about this enigmatic figure, many questions about Akhenaten and the Atenism religion remain unanswered.
In Akhenaten and the Origins of Monotheism, James K. Hoffmeier argues that Akhenaten was not, as is often said, a radical advocating a new religion, but rather a primitivist: that is, one who reaches back to a golden age and emulates it. Akhenaten's inspiration was the Old Kingdom (2650-2400 B.C.E.), when the sun-god Re/Atum ruled as the unrivaled head of the Egyptian pantheon. Hoffmeier finds that Akhenaten was a genuine convert to the worship of Aten, the sole creator God, based on the Pharoah's own testimony of a theophany, a divine encounter that launched his monotheistic religious odyssey. The book also explores the Atenist religion's possible relationship to Israel's religion, offering a close comparison of the hymn to the Aten to Psalm 104, which has been identified by scholars as influenced by the Egyptian hymn.
Through a careful reading of key texts, artworks, and archaeological studies, Hoffmeier provides compelling new insights into a religion that predated Moses and Hebrew monotheism, the impact of Atenism on Egyptian religion and politics, and the aftermath of Akhenaten's reign.

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 The greatness that was Babylon; a sketch of the ancient civilization of the Tigris-Euphrates Valley
The greatness that was Babylon; a sketch of the ancient civilization of the Tigris-Euphrates Valley
The greatness that was Babylon; a sketch of the ancient civilization of the Tigris-Euphrates Valley
New York, Hawthorn Books, Inc; First Edition edition
Author:Saggs, H. W. F
1962

Language:English
Format:pdf
Size:123 Mb

A sketch of the ancient civilization of the Tigris-Euphrates valley

"And a mighty angel took up a stone like a great millstone, and cast it into the sea, saying: Thus with violence shall that great city Babylon be thrown down and shall be found no more at all.". REVELATIONS XVIII : 21

Splendor and degradation are the marks; that centuries have placed upon the ancient land of Babylon. Its history has been too often neglected because of the many enigmas that have baffled scholars since the time of its fall.

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 Alesia 52 BC: The final struggle for Gaul
Alesia 52 BC: The final struggle for Gaul
Alesia 52 BC: The final struggle for Gaul
Author: Nic Fields, Peter Dennis
Osprey Publishing
Osprey Campaign 269
ISBN: 978 1782009221
2014
Language: English
Pages: 98
Format: PDF (e-book)
Size: 9,7 MB

In 52 BC Caesar’s continued strategy of annihilation had engendered a spirit of desperation, which detonated into a revolt of Gallic tribes under the leadership of the charismatic young Arvernian noble Vercingetorix. Major engagements were fought at Noviodunum, Avaricum, and Gergovia, with the last action being the most serious reverse that Caesar faced in the whole of the Gallic War. However, Vercingetorix soon realized that he was unable to match the Romans in pitched battle. Taking advantage of the tribesmen’s superior knowledge of their home territory, Vercingetorix began a canny policy of small war and defensive manoeuvres, which gravely hampered Caesar’s movements by cutting off his supplies. For Caesar it was to be a grim summertime – his whole Gallic enterprise faced disaster. In the event, by brilliant leadership, force of arms, and occasionally sheer luck, Caesar succeeded in stamping out the revolt in a long and brutal action culminating in the siege of Alesia. Vercingetorix finally surrendered and Alesia was to be the last significant resistance to the Roman will. Never again would a Gallic warlord independent of Rome hold sway over the Celts of Gaul.

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